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May 1, 2017

The navel orangeworm egg laying biofix based on the egg trap for Modesto and northern part of Merced is 19 April with the predicted 100 DD spray timing is now moved to May 2 due to the relatively cooler past 10 days or so (previously I posted was April 30). Click here for other details.

March 14, 2017

We are organizing a field meeting to discuss on several aspects of navel orangeworm mating disruption in almonds and walnuts.

When: 22 March, 2017, 8:30-10:30am

Where: Almond orchard located between Henry Road and Victory Ave, Escalon, CA

Invasive species are plants, animals, fungi or microbes that are not native to an area, but can quickly establish, multiply, and become pests. These species can hurt the environment, agricultural production, and even human health in some instances (e.g. the mosquito Aedes aegypti). According to the USDA, invasive species are responsible for $137 billion per year in economic losses in the United States.

In agricultural systems, invasive species may reduce yields, render crops unmarketable, or make rangeland unfavorable to livestock. In natural areas, they may squeeze out native species, change soil quality, and increase the frequency or intensity of wildfires.

Some of these species have been introduced intentionally (e.g., yellow sweetclover, which was originally imported from Europe as a forage species for livestock), while others arrived by accident (e.g., the glassy-winged sharpshooter which came to California inadvertently through nursery stock shipments).

Just one species can be detri...

We are in the midst of a new and changing era of Worker Protection Standards (WPS). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) recently published the revised WPS, which is meant to increase protections for agricultural fieldworkers and pesticide handlers from pesticide exposure when they’re working in farms, forests, nurseries and greenhouses. The changes are already affecting California agriculture!

What major regulatory changes have already gone into effect?

Several changes are required to have been in place as of January 2, 2017. These include:
 

  • All 417,000 fieldworkers in California must attend annual pesticide safety training.

  • Records of all fieldworker pesticide safety trainings must be kept on file for 2 years.

  • Fields must be posted when the restricted entry interval (REI) exceeds 48 hours.

  • “Application-exclusion zones” must be implemented to prevent the entry of anyone into areas up to 100 feet fro...

The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) runs the most extensive Pesticide Residue Monitoring Program in the nation and is hard at work ensuring that the fruit and vegetables we purchase and consume are free from illegal pesticide residues.  Just last month, DPR detected residues of a pesticide not registered for use on grapes and fined the grower $10,000 for using a pesticide in violation of the label and for packing and attempting to sell the tainted produce.

Cases like this are rare in California but remind growers how important it is to apply pesticides correctly by following all pesticide label directions.  Understanding and following label instructions is the focus of a new online course developed by the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program (UC IPM).

Proper Pesticide Use to Avoid Illegal Residues is targeted to those who apply pesticides or make pesticide recommendations.  It explains what pesticide r...

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) recently published the revised Agricultural Worker Protection Standard (WPS).  The WPS is meant to increase protections for agricultural fieldworkers and pesticide handlers from pesticide exposure when working in farms, forests, nurseries and greenhouses. The changes will definitely affect California agriculture, and soon-- as early as January 2017 in some cases.

What major regulatory changes are in store for us and when will they happen?

Several changes are required to be in place by January 2, 2017. These include:

  • All 417,000 fieldworkers in California must attend annual pesticide safety training.

  • Records of all fieldworker pesticide safety trainings must be kept on file for 2 years.

  • Fields must be posted when the restricted entry interval (REI) exceeds 48 hours.

  • Instructors previously certified via Train-the-Trainer to lead pesticide safety trainings must now attend an EPA-approved Train-the-Trainer course...

Various insects, birds, and other animals pollinate plants. Bees, especially honey bees, are the most vital for pollinating food crops. Many California crops rely on bees to pollinate their flowers and ensure a good yield of seeds, fruit, and nuts.  Pesticides, especially insecticides, can harm bees if they are applied or allowed to drift to plants that are flowering.

Our mission at the University of California Agricultural and Natural Resources (UC ANR), Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program (UC IPM) is to protect the environment by reducing risks caused by pest management practices. UC IPM developed Bee Precaution Pesticide Ratings to help pest managers make an informed decision about how to protect bees when choosing or applying pesticides.  You can find and compare ratings for pesticide active ingredients including acaricides (miticides), bactericides, fungicides, herbicides, and insecticides, and select the one posing the least harm to bees.

Ratings fall into three categories...

August 18, 2016

As we are busy in harvesting almonds, and waiting to harvest walnuts. This may be a good time to refresh memory on when and how to collect harvest samples and evaluate the sample nuts for the insect damage. Click here for the details.

June 20, 2016

The second flight of navel orangeworm is tapering....

Biofix dates (based on trap catches in Modesto area (Ceres, Denair, Hughson):

Oriental Fruit Moth: 1st flight (Feb. 16), 2nd flight (April 28), 3rd flight (June 9)

Degree days (3rd flight) at 7/7: 804

Peach Twig Borer: 1st flight (March 28), 2nd flight (June 2)

Degree days (2nd flight) at 7/7: 829

Codling moth: 1st flight (March 25), 2nd flight (June 4)

Degree days (2DD) at 6/29: 586

Navel orangeworm egg biofix: Spring egg biofix (April 18)

Spring/May spray timing (100DD): April 29

Obliquebanded leafroller: 1st flight (April 12)

Details of weekly monitoring is here. Currently, you can get the trap counts/DD information for codling moth, navel orangeworm, oriental fruit moth, peach twig borer, obliquebanded leafroller. The usefulness of this information can be limited. Out traps are about 4-5 different orchard blocks within 5-7 miles radius from our office (UCCE Stanislaus), and insect activities can vary from orchard to orchard depending...

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I'm an Integrated Pest Management Advisor aka 'IPM Advisor' with the University of California. My doctoral degree is from Virginia Tech. I have a strong background in the field and lab-based research and like to apply my skill and expertise to solve the real-world agricultural pest problems. The other major aspect of my job is the extension of knowledge and new information to the pest control professionals, growers, and allied stakeholders. I always enjoy working on research and extension interface.

 

Contact:

University of California Cooperative Extension

Stanislaus County

3800 Cornucopia Way, Suite A

Modesto, CA 95358 

Ph: (209) 525-6800

Email: jrijal@ucdavis.edu

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